Posts Tagged ‘Book’

Christ above all: Conversational Evangelism with People of Other Faiths. 

Daniel Shayesteh
#christian #christianity #humanism #christ #church #book #evangelism #faith #faiths

Book is not dead

Posted: 16/03/2016 in Books
Etichete:, ,

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Just wondering about the editor’s intentions now. It’s quite puzzling! Not that intriguing though, if you read Eschatology – in the Bible – and in Jewish and Cristian Tradition.
It comes with the Package.

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The Invisible Hand by Dr. R.C. SproulHow can a God of love allow suffering and injustice in the world? Why we had to go through such awful events last year? Why is He allowing confusion sometimes, to cry and be in pain. Why there’s no answer to my prayer?

Although people today have some answers and approach this subject in different ways, the biblical answer to the problem of evil and suffering is the only true and liberating answer you can find.

Sproul is presenting God and His ways with a wonderful logic and clear insight. He is very biblical in his style of defending the truth about God’s sovereignty and providence.

In a very generous and warm environment, he is calling us to trust this good and loving God who really has all things in His hands and does not allow something in your life without a holy purpose, often misunderstood by us.

We are called to embrace these dark moments with hope, always recognizing God’s love and care, and believe that, as he is saying … the providence of God is our fortress, our shield, and our very great reward. It is what provides courage and perseverance for His saints.

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Each book written by Max Lucado talks about living a life of worship before God. I’m filled with passion and desire to know and love the Savior more and more. Each book revolves around the person of Jesus Christ.

Max gives us the privilege in Grace. More than we deserve, Greater than we imagine, to look at God revealed to us in Christ Jesus, but goes even further and challenges us to jump in the arms of God’s grace, a grace that changes us, transforms us, shapes us and strengthens our lives. It meets us where we are but does not leave us where it found us.

This book is real. Like God’s grace. No theories. Live words.

This is life as war zone. Drought, doubt, debt, and disease, and Max is sharing some of his battles, some of his dark moments. He’s speaking about his heart procedure or the time when he struggled about his beer cravings and his confession in the church about his hypocrisy. It wasn’t easy but it was grace at work.

Tara Storch loosing her daughter and finding grace, Victoria Ruvolo offering grace (mai mult…)

jean valjeanMy first attempt to read a novel was, I guess, at eleven. I haven’t read much in childhood unfortunately. I seriously started to read only after I’ve met God. God filled me spiritually and only then I realized how empty I was intellectually.

So, the first attempt was Les Miserables by Victor Hugo. I don’t think I finished it. I did tried to read it several times and nearly always my mum woke me up. I didn’t understood much because of that. No wonder…

The names were interesting though. Jean Valjean, Cosette, Javert etc. French. And Romania likes French stuff. Travel to Bucharest and you’ll see Little Paris. We copy paste Paris without a licence. They tought it will be a good ideea to copy paste the language and culture. I was taught French from my 2nd grade till I finished high school. Maybe that’s why I started to hate it. Nothing personal or national. I assume it was just my old teacher. Her style was slightly communist. But enough about my petite histoire francais

Talking about Les Miserables, I realized that it’s a sad and beautiful story, but also a story about God’s grace. Max Lucado brilliantly points this out in his book, Grace.

JeanValjeanValjean enters the pages as a vagabond. A just-released prisoner in midlife, wearing threadbare trousers and a tattered jacket. Nineteen years in a French prison have left him rough and fearless. He’s walked for four days in the Alpine chill of nineteenth-century southeastern France, just to find out that no inn will take him, no tavern will feed him. Finally he knocks on the door of a bishop’s house.

Monseigneur Myrel is seventy-five years old. Like Valjean he has lost much. The revolution took all the valuables from his family except some silverware, a soup ladle, and two candlesticks. Valjean tells his story and expects the religious man to turn him away. Butthe (mai mult…)

father-watching-baby-sleepI suddenly woke up last night at four o’clock, sweaty, after a bad dream. On a scale of 1 to10, where 1 is an uncomfortable dream and 10 is a terrible nightmare, Laura would give it a 4 or 5. She shared some ugly nightmares from her past that would make my dream a silly little daydream.

But, for me it was quite scary. Prepare yourself. It requires the consent of an adult before you read this. It can leave you with a trauma if you don’t watch your own heart.

So, I dreamed that I was in my car and ran a red light but I did not realize it. All the people were off the road and looked at me as if I did something seriously wrong. Sensing that all looked very suspicious, I stopped, got out of the car and asked what was happening. Why is everyone looking at me like this, in this scary way. A lady replied that I ran a red light and saw how the camera took a picture of my car. (mai mult…)

In this analytical and technological age there is no shortage of books on the church bookstalls, or sermons from the pulpits, on how to pray, how to witness, how to read our Bibles, how to tithe our money, how to be a young Christian, how to be an old Christian, how to be a happy Christian, how to get consecrated,  how to lead men to Christ, how to receive the baptism of the Holy Spirit (or, in some cases, how to avoid receiving it), how to speak with tongues (or, how to explain away Pentecostal manifestations), and generally how to go through all the various motions which the teachers in question associate with being a Christian believer. Nor is there any shortage of biographies delineating the experiences of Cristians in past days for our interested perusal.
Yet one can have all this and hardly know God at all.
            J.I.Packer, Knowing God, p.23

This book by J.I.Packer was written in 1973. In 40 years, thousands of books on Christian topics like the ones described above had been written and it seems that, as knowledge about God grows like never before, less people really know God at all.
I had a big surprise when I first came in this country. I was expecting to taste a bit of that Christianity that shaped the evangelical Christianity in Romania. That type of Christianity and Christian authors that changed the world for Christ. Big mistake.
My awakening came when I’ve met a Chinese pastor at British Museum. He told me that, in the past, missionaries went from England all around the world. But now there is a need for authentic Christianity in UK. Now, those who benefited from that Gospel must come back and bring back that desire and passion about knowing God.
Unfortunately, this is a tragic moment in the history of this country. You cannot notice a dying Christianity in the UK. Yes, we know about God. A lot of noise. But, from what I’ve met, sadly, too many, don’t know God at all.

I watched the last interview with Paul Tripp today. Josh Vincent, pastor of Trinity Bible Church in Phoenix is talking with him about some things written in his latest book Dangerous Calling: Confronting the Unique Challenges of Pastoral Ministry. I have not read the book yet but I hope to get it somehow. For a young minister it’s very encouraging to hear what he says.

I liked the way he explains several aspects about the pastor’s family, the fact that you are God’s spokesman, about getting lost in administrative things, fellowship with other ministers, worship while preparing the message, the humour in preaching. It opened my appetite. I want to get hold of the book now and put some things in order.